Treaty Land Entitlement Framework Agreement Saskatchewan

Treaty Land Entitlement Framework Agreement Saskatchewan

We did not review the contractual trust contracts for land rights used to manage funds received under the agreements and we did not look at First Nations or other organizations involved in this process. 4.15 Following our review in 2005, the Minister of Indian and Northern Affairs, at the 18th Annual General Meeting of the Manitoba Assembly of Chiefs in August 2006, committed the federal government to convert 150,000 hectares of land in Manitoba to reserve status for each of the next four years. At the time, the Department indicated that less than 130,000 hectares had been converted to reserve status in Manitoba since the original defence contract was signed in 1997. 4.44 On the other hand, the Department has actively supported Saskatchewan First Nations in resolving third-party interests. For example, in one of the files we studied, we found additional ways to resolve the interests of third parties for a land selection that was a priority for a First Nation. Willing Buyer – Willing SellerThe rest of the agreement deals with issues such as which groups of countries are available for purchase, third-party rights, mining rights and water rights. Bands can use the funds to acquire provincial or federal land and land from individuals. All sales are based on Willing Buyer, Willing Seller. Since the signing of the framework agreement on September 22, 1992, eight other First Nations, who were not originally signatories to the framework agreement, have been validated under the framework agreement and their specific agreements have been ratified and signed. First Nations are still working to fill the gaps: 4.37 We found that the Department`s priority for the conversion of large areas in Manitoba had a negative impact on the time it took to process land in Saskatchewan. Phase III of the predator process requires departmental headquarters staff to process the matter and receive either a ministerial decision or a decision on the Board. Since the 2006 commitment prioritized the processing of Manitoba land conversion files at the department`s headquarters, average Phase III processing times for Saskatchewan land selection have nearly tripled from 76 days to 210 days. According to the ministry, it now takes almost twice as long for the Phase III selection process to be completed in Saskatchewan as it was when the manitoba selection was completed.

Delays in land processing in Saskatchewan sometimes have direct financial benefits for both Saskatchewan First Nations and the Department. 4. VIDEO ACTIVITY – To better illustrate and understand the Saskatchewan Country Qualification Agreement, let students watch Part 3 of From Dream to Reality. In considering the challenges that had to be overcome before reaching an agreement on contractual land authorization, it is worth noting the challenges to be met. KEY QUESTION: How will the Saskatchewan Framework Agreement on Basic Conditions of Land Rights respond to the challenges before an agreement can be reached? On September 22, 1992, 25 First Nations signed the TLE Framework Agreement in Saskatchewan to settle their TLE arrears. Under the agreement, the provincial and federal governments have committed $440 million over 12 years to First Nations signatories to purchase land, mineral rights and improvements, including country buildings and structures.